934

Showing all 7 results

  • A surgical approach – Sharpen your project accounting with activity-based costing

    Spring 2020
    Newsletter: On-Site

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: Activity-based costing is an accounting methodology that identifies activities and assigns a “cost driver” to each one based on resources consumed. This article explains how this approach can be applied to various jobsite activities. A sidebar points out that, once proper formulas are established, cost-driver calculations can often be applied for a long time.

    Read More

  • A surgical approach – Sharpen your project accounting with activity-based costing

    March / April 2020
    Newsletter: Contractor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: Activity-based costing is an accounting methodology that identifies activities and assigns a “cost driver” to each one based on resources consumed. This article explains how this approach can be applied to various jobsite activities. A sidebar points out that, once proper formulas are established, cost-driver calculations can often be applied for a long time.

    Read More

  • Speeding up the payment process – Supply chain financing for construction projects

    Winter 2019
    Newsletter: On-Site

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: Working relationships between general contractors and subcontractors depend largely on the timeliness of payments from the former to the latter. This article explores the benefits and risks of an accelerated payment solution that’s gaining steam in the construction industry: supply chain financing. A sidebar looks at how technology is making supply chain financing more feasible than ever.

    Read More

  • Construction accounting update – New guidance addresses certain leasing arrangements

    Summer 2014
    Newsletter: On-Site

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has issued new guidance that permits private companies following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to, in some circumstances, elect not to consolidate the financial reporting from variable interest entities (VIEs) that lease property to them. This article explains how to determine whether an entity is a VIE and when a private company may elect an alternative not to apply the previously established GAAP VIE guidance to a lessor. However, a sidebar discusses certain disclosures that will still be required.

    Read More

  • Do you know how to recoup your equipment costs?

    Summer 2008
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: Capturing equipment costs can be a challenge, but it’s well worth the effort. Equipment costs should be charged to each contract using a method that reflects the extent to which the equipment was used on that job. The secret to success lies in knowing the methods available and how to use them. This article explains how to calculate equipment costs, so you can allocate them to the appropriate contract. A special sidebar offers a sample calculation. (Updated 2/23/12)

    Read More

  • Losing control – Ninth Circuit examines distribution’s role in copyright case

    June / July 2011
    Newsletter: Ideas on Intellectual Property Law

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: When copyright holders release their creations, they can retain some control through licensing agreements. So one music company sued the recipient of recordings it had sent to him, unsolicited and free of charge, when he then sold them on eBay. But the court ruled that the company’s “Promotional Use — Not for Sale” label was insufficient to establish a license. This article explains the court’s reasons, while a sidebar examines the role of the Unordered Merchandise statute in this case. UMG Recordings, Inc. v. Augusto, No. 08-55998, Jan. 4, 2011 (9th Cir.)

    Read More

  • Know your financial pulse: It could save your company’s life

    Summer 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: Just as a wise patient undergoes regular medical checkups, a construction company should have regular financial checkups. Doing so will help it stay in compliance with loan covenants and maintain its bonding capacity. There are numerous ratios and other metrics that can be used, but it’s important for a contractor to select a manageable number of indicators that makes sense for the company and measure its performance in various areas. Four especially important kinds of ratios involve profitability, liquidity, leverage and efficiency; this article gives examples of each kind. A sidebar discusses the importance of negotiating loan covenants with lenders in this constricted lending environment.

    Read More