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Showing all 13 results

  • Making the most of the new pass-through deduction

    January / February 2019
    Newsletter: Planning for Prosperity / Wealth Management Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, owners of pass-through entities may now deduct up to 20% of their qualified business income. However, the deduction is subject to income limitations. This article proposes one planning opportunity involving nongrantor trusts for those whose taxable income exceeds the threshold.

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  • 2018 surety outlook: No surprises, but slow industry growth

    Winter 2018
    Newsletter: On-Site

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: As a new calendar year unfolds, many contractors are no doubt wondering what, if anything, will change with their sureties. Although it doesn’t appear that any big surprises are in store, the state of the U.S. construction industry may affect bonding for some companies. This article explores industry forecasts and sureties’ potential response.

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  • Overseas account holders may have to face FATCA

    Year End 2016
    Newsletter: Trendlines

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Anyone who holds bank or other financial accounts outside of the United States should stay apprised of his or her tax-reporting responsibilities under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). This article explains which types of assets fall under FATCA; who may not have to report; and how severe the penalties are under the law.

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  • Should you consolidate your common-control leasing agreements?

    January / February 2016
    Newsletter: Dealer Insights

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Accounting standards in the past had made it cumbersome for dealerships to set up a separate leasing entity for their real estate or heavy equipment investments. That was because of the complicated financial reporting requirements to combine (or “consolidate”) the entity’s financial results. But it’s easier now to create a separate legal entity as an effective way to achieve various tax and financial planning objectives or to limit your legal liability. This article highlights the ins and outs of setting up a separate leasing entity.

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  • Estate planning for disabled children – ABLE accounts vs. special needs trusts

    November / December 2015
    Newsletter: Estate Planner

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: For families with a disabled child, financial planning can be a challenge, because loved ones don’t want to jeopardize the child’s eligibility for means-tested government benefits, especially after family members are no longer around to provide for the child. This article examines the benefits and drawbacks to two solutions to this problem: ABLE accounts and special needs trusts.

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  • The BDIT – Realize estate planning benefits while retaining control

    January / February 2015
    Newsletter: Planning for Prosperity / Wealth Management Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: After spending a lifetime building one’s net worth, it’s normal to not want to give up control of property, as is required for certain estate and asset protection strategies. A relatively new trust — the beneficiary defective inheritor’s trust (BDIT) — avoids this drawback. This article describes how a BDIT accomplishes this, and how it’s structured to be intentionally “income tax defective,” making it possible to produce significant estate planning benefits.

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  • Take us to your leader – Appraisers assess company risk with key-person discounts

    Spring 2013
    Newsletter: Expert / Valuation & Litigation Concepts

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: The great thing about “key people” is that they’re indispensable. But that’s also the bad thing: Their company would likely start to struggle almost immediately upon their departure or sudden demise. Appraisers recognize this danger and have a detailed way of calculating its effect on business value: the key-person discount. This article explains when it’s applicable — and, on the opposite side of the coin, how certain factors can reduce or eliminate use of this discount.

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  • Business-owned life insurance: Handle with care

    November / December 2010
    Newsletter: Estate Planner

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Business-owned life insurance serves a number of legitimate purposes, including succession and estate planning. A big advantage of using life insurance is that the proceeds typically are tax free. But there have been abuses, particularly by large companies that purchased insurance on the lives of lower-level employees, often without their knowledge. Indignation over these so-called “janitor policies” led Congress to add Section 101(j) to the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) as part of the Pension Protection Act of 2006 (PPA). This article explains that, even though this provision is intended to prevent abusive employment practices, it’s broad enough to encompass life insurance used to fund a buy-sell agreement or for other estate planning purposes.

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  • Measuring effectiveness – Are overhead ratios becoming a thing of the past?

    Spring 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Overhead ratios represent the percentage of funds nonprofits spend on administration and fundraising vs. programs. But this metric has traditionally been used by charity watchdog groups as a proxy for overall effectiveness. This has led some organizations to underreport their nonprogram costs and neglect making critical infrastructure investments. In response to growing discontent with overhead ratios, watchdog groups and nonprofit leaders are beginning to consider broader measures of nonprofit effectiveness.

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  • Splitting the insurance bill – Family split-dollar arrangements can reduce gift taxes

    February / March 2010
    Newsletter: Insight on Estate Planning

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Dave and Susan have established an irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) to purchase and hold a second-to-die life insurance policy. When the second spouse dies, the death benefit will be paid to the trust estate-tax free and then distributed tax free to their daughter, Anna, the trust’s beneficiary. There’s just one problem: To cover the policy’s premium, Dave and Susan make annual contributions to the ILIT, which are considered taxable gifts to Anna. Because of the way the trust is structured, the couple can use their combined annual gift tax exclusions to shield a portion of each contribution from gift tax. But the remaining portion is still a taxable gift. A family split-dollar insurance arrangement may be the answer.

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  • Oh, what might have been – How appraisers calculate lost profits

    Winter 2010
    Newsletter: Expert / Valuation & Litigation Concepts

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: When a business suffers what it believes to be wrongful conduct leading to lost profits, an appraiser is often asked to estimate “what might have been.” That is, for the resulting litigation, he or she must typically calculate, not just lost sales, but also the difference between lost sales and avoided costs. The appraiser starts by distinguishing between direct and indirect costs. He or she is then free to use multiple methodologies and compare the results to historical data, independent estimates or industry statistics. A lost profits calculation is a complex endeavor — but it’s often absolutely necessary in certain forms of litigation.

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  • Taking stock of your inventory accounting method

    March / April 2009
    Newsletter: Tax Impact

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: If your business involves the production, purchase or sale of merchandise, inventory accounting can have a significant effect on your tax bill. In some cases, switching inventory accounting methods from first-in, first-out (FIFO) to last-in, first-out (LIFO) can reduce your taxable income, giving your cash flow a boost. This article reviews factors to consider with inventory accounting methods, including tax savings and the effect the change will have on financial statements.

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  • Buying damaged goods? How to evaluate a distressed company’s potential

    February / March 2008
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 685

    Abstract: Thorough due diligence and a professional valuation can help reveal whether a distressed company is a diamond in the rough or fatally flawed. This article provides tips on spotting imminent trouble, including debt reduction programs and cost-cutting tactics. It also helps buyers evaluate an acquisition’s hidden opportunities, by weighing its market position, demographic trends, revenue growth, cash reserves and industry conditions. (Updated 3/31/12)

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