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Showing 1–16 of 23 results

  • A busy industry: M&A activity is hot in construction

    September / October 2019
    Newsletter: Contractor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: The construction industry saw many merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions in 2018. Although activity is expected to cool off by the end of 2019, there are still plenty of deals under consideration and in the works. This article discusses some fundamental M&A concepts that contractors should know.

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  • Proper preparation can cut your audit costs

    June / July 2019
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: Outside financial audits may seem like an extravagance to nonprofits working to contain costs and focus on their mission. But undergoing regular audits allows organizations to identify risks early and act quickly to prevent problems. Independent audits also provide valuable reassurance to donors and other stakeholders that your ship is on course. This article offers some suggestions on how to prepare for an audit properly, which, in turn, can cut costs.

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  • Master the disaster – Plan now to minimize damages

    April / May 2019
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: No organization today, nonprofit or otherwise, can afford to ignore the possibility of a natural or manmade threat that cripples operations. From hurricanes and wildfires, active shooters and cyberattacks, to things as seemingly minor as a burst pipe, any operation can be vulnerable. This article outlines how to assess, and reduce, risks and create an effective emergency response plan.

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  • Trust in a trust to keep assets secure

    August / September 2018
    Newsletter: Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: Whether the economic climate is stable or volatile, one thing never changes: the need to protect assets from risk. That risk may occur as a result of factors entirely outside of owner control, such as the stock market or the behavior of heirs and creditors. This article points out that it’s wise to consider taking steps to mitigate the potential peril, including setting up a trust. The article explains that a trust can be a great way to protect assets. But to ensure the funds are unavailable to satisfy claims against the owner, the trust must become the owner of the assets and be irrevocable.

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  • Gain flexibility with a self-directed IRA

    May / June 2018
    Newsletter: Tax Impact

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: Traditional and Roth IRAs are considered relatively “safe” retirement-savings vehicles, but a drawback to them is that they limit investment choices. A self-directed IRA provides more flexibility in investment choices with potentially greater returns, including real estate, precious metals, energy and other alternative investments. On the downside, self-directed IRAs are riskier and can lead to unfavorable tax consequences. This article explains how a self-directed IRA affects an estate plan.

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  • Reviewing retainage, in concept and practice

    Fall 2017
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: One way construction project owners look to mitigate risk is through retainage. Many contractors’ feelings about this range from annoyance to outrage, yet the practice continues. This article reviews the concept of retainage and suggests some ways to potentially mitigate its negative effect.

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  • What can you do to prevent employee fraud?

    Spring 2017
    Newsletter: Rx for Practice Management / Practice Management Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: It’s important for medical professionals to be aware of the potential for employee fraud in their practices and to ensure that their internal controls are designed to provide maximum protection. This article explains the most common types of employee fraud and lists several steps management can take to keep it from happening, such as conducting a risk assessment, separating staff duties and monitoring employee behavior.

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  • Don’t compare apples to oranges – Evaluate borrowers accurately by normalizing financial statements

    Winter 2017
    Newsletter: Community Banking Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: Borrowers’ accounting practices can vary widely. An accounting tool called “normalizing” can help adjust income statements and balance sheets to compensate for companies’ different accounting methods. Failing to normalize financial statements may result in faulty lending decisions. This article uses some examples to illustrate how normalizing works and the difference it can make in helping a lender who is evaluating a borrower accurately compare its practices to those of a competitor or to industry benchmarks.

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  • Income-tax-saving strategies for your estate plan

    November / December 2015
    Newsletter: Planning for Prosperity / Wealth Management Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: For 2015, the federal estate tax exemption is $5.43 million, so most people don’t need to be concerned about estate taxes. However, many middle- and upper-income taxpayers still need to plan for income taxes. This article suggests two strategies a taxpayer might incorporate into an estate plan: 1) Hold on to appreciated assets and 2) make charitable donations during one’s lifetime.

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  • Succession planning – Who’ll be the next in line?

    November / December 2015
    Newsletter: Dealer Insights

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: Retirement can sneak up on dealership owners. One day they’re spending hours at the helm of their dealership, making a bevy of leadership decisions. The next day they’re eyeing golfing engagements, volunteer opportunities and part-time consulting gigs. This article addresses taking the right steps now to prepare for the transition to a new leader.

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  • When to look a gift horse in the mouth — and report its value

    Summer 2015
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: When a nonprofit receives a generous gift of noncash property, it needs to assess the gift’s fair market value (FMV). This article defines FMV and lists factors that help determine value, including a gift’s cost, its selling price or the value of a comparable good. It also explains when a professional appraisal is needed.

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  • Which type of mortgage loan meets your needs?

    March / April 2015
    Newsletter: Planning for Prosperity / Wealth Management Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: Few purchases during a person’s lifetime will be as expensive as buying a home. Whether it’s a primary residence, a vacation home or an investment property, how a person chooses to pay for it can have a significant impact on his or her financial situation over time. This article details two types of mortgage loans and explains situations where one may be a better choice than the other.

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  • A window to your world – Your annual report is a mighty communications tool

    October / November 2014
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: The annual report is an organization’s No. 1 communications tool. What other vehicle has the potential to favorably impress new and prospective donors, volunteers, community partners, sponsors, board members, lending institutions, clients — and the media? But putting together an effective report is no slam dunk. It starts with the basic elements, such as an independent auditor’s report or a statement of cash flows. This article offers suggestions for adding creativity to the descriptive section of the report.

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  • Safety net essentials — Now more than ever, you need operating reserves

    Spring 2012
    Newsletter: Profitable Solutions for Nonprofits

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: One study of charities found that 57% of the organizations surveyed had insufficient operating reserves to cover three months of expenses — the minimum level many experts consider necessary to maintain financial stability. Forgoing reserves leaves nonprofits vulnerable to rapid or unexpected drops in revenue or jumps in expenses. This article explains why it’s necessary to have sufficient operating reserves, and offers questions a nonprofit should ask itself when trying to determine what is sufficient.

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  • Semantics matter – When using ascertainable standards, precise language is a must

    Year End 2011
    Newsletter: Insight on Estate Planning

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: If a trust includes the use of ascertainable standards (which limit distributions to amounts needed for a beneficiary’s health, education, support and maintenance), how the standards are drafted is critical to its success. As this article explains, ascertainable standards are objective, so they limit the trustee’s discretion and allow a court to determine whether distributions are appropriate or should be compelled. But precision of language is important to head off disputes.

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  • Spotting customers ripe for a turnaround

    Year End 2011
    Newsletter: Commercial Lending Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 651

    Abstract: As the economy continues to mend — sputtering along the way — commercial lenders must remain ever-vigilant in identifying customers that show signs of financial distress. An ailing customer may be a good candidate for a financial workout, or a “turnaround.” This article shows how to detect problems early and how a turnaround team works.

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