625

Showing 1–16 of 18 results

  • Be vigilant and avoid fraud traps

    February / March 2021
    Newsletter: Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: The only way for individuals to make sure they don’t become victims of fraud is to stay up to date on the continually evolving methods criminals might try to use and learn how to counteract those methods. This article offers some ways people can defend themselves, such as conducting due diligence on charities before donating and learning how to detect phishing emails.

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  • How does the CARES Act affect your retirement accounts?

    July / August 2020
    Newsletter: Tax Impact

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: As individuals continue to deal with the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act contains some retirement-related provisions to help ease the financial pain. This article details three of the main retirement-related provisions.

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  • Staying on top of preventive maintenance

    May / June 2020
    Newsletter: Real Estate Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Performing routine building inspections and maintenance on a regular basis can help avoid unnecessary headaches. Setting a consistent, ongoing schedule is the first step. This article covers the importance of tracking inventory, scheduling inspections and repairs, and estimating costs of maintenance.

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  • No harm, no foul – Fair use defense wins trademark infringement case

    April / May 2020
    Newsletter: Ideas on Intellectual Property Law

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Athletes are known for “leaving it all on the field,” or going all out in competition. A nutritional consultant firm for athletes recently took the same mindset to a trademark battle — but it didn’t emerge victorious, because a court found its opponent’s use of its mark was fair. This article examines the fair use defense and how the defendant used it to overcome a claim of trademark infringement. SportFuel, Inc., v. PepsiCo, Inc., No. 18-3010, Aug. 2, 2019, 7th Cir.

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  • How nonrecourse loan carveouts jeopardize personal liability

    May / June 2019
    Newsletter: Real Estate Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: With the many types of loans available to borrowers, nonrecourse loans remain popular with borrowers because they can shield them from personal liability. But lenders will try to add “carveouts” to minimize that protection. If borrowers violate carveouts in the loan document, they may be left with full liability. This article highlights why both lenders and borrowers will negotiate nonrecourse loan carveouts, with borrowers looking to minimize personal liability.

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  • Taxes matter – Plan ahead to minimize tax liabilities in damages litigation

    January / February 2018
    Newsletter: Valuation & Litigation Briefing / Litigation & Valuation Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Payment of a damages judgment or settlement almost always has tax consequences for plaintiffs and defendants. The appropriate tax treatment typically depends on the nature of the underlying claim or claims. This article provides an overview of the tax issues that may arise in damages litigation, along with some possible ways to improve tax results throughout the litigation process.

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  • Burning question: Do physical tests discriminate against women?

    March / April 2017
    Newsletter: Employment Law Briefing

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Recently, the Seventh Circuit decided whether the City of Chicago discriminated against paramedic job applicants in violation of Title VII. The applicants claimed that a physical test disparately impacted women and that the city had a discriminatory intent when it implemented the test. This article discusses the case and its outcome. Ernst v. City of Chicago, Nos. 14-3783, 15-2030, September 19, 2016 (7th Cir.)

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  • The new overtime rule: What it means for hospitals

    Winter 2017
    Newsletter: Healthcare Management Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: With the new overtime rule issued by the U.S. Department of Labor in 2016, the number of employees who qualify for overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act has expanded dramatically. This article explains the impact of the new rule on hospital staff. It also looks at the options hospitals have in determining how to best meet the compensation requirements while balancing budgetary constraints.

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  • Bross Trucking Inc. v. Commissioner – Determining the value of personal goodwill

    May / June 2015
    Newsletter: Valuation & Litigation Briefing / Litigation & Valuation Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Personal goodwill in business valuation is alive and well, as a 2014 U.S. Tax Court case demonstrates. The court concluded that virtually all goodwill associated with a trucking company belonged to its owner. As a result, he didn’t receive goodwill from the corporation or make a gift of those assets to his three sons, who formed a new company. This article discusses the differences between business and personal goodwill. Bross Trucking Inc. v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo 2014-107 (6/5/14)

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  • Powerful words – COO’s statements leave employer in the legal lurch

    January / February 2015
    Newsletter: Employment Law Briefing

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: When a 71-year-old security guard was laid off from his job at the retirement home he lived in, he filed an age discrimination suit. The COO claimed that he’d decided to eliminate the resident employee program to save costs and assure a better trained workforce. The district court granted summary judgment, and the plaintiff appealed, stating that the court had erred in doing so before he had any opportunity to conduct discovery. The appellate court agreed, holding that the plaintiff had offered direct evidence of discriminatory intent and so was entitled to a trial. This article notes that part of that evidence was the COO’s earlier statements to the EEOC that suggested a discriminatory attitude. Wilson v. Cox, No. 12-5070, June 3, 2014 (D.C. Cir.)

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  • The challenge of estimating damages in IP cases

    January / February 2014
    Newsletter: Valuation & Litigation Briefing / Litigation & Valuation Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: In an intellectual property (IP) case, it’s important to have a qualified valuator. Why? Because in some IP litigation, it may be possible to recover certain damages that are based on profits the defendant enjoyed as a result of its infringement. This article looks at the theory behind damages, how valuators might attempt to apportion sales among infringing and noninfringing activities, and the ways that a court might determine lost profits.

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  • Tread carefully when firing employees on FMLA leave

    January / February 2014
    Newsletter: Employment Law Briefing

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Deciding to terminate any employee is risky. But the risk level associated with terminating those who have requested leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is markedly greater. After a nonprofit terminated an employee who was on FMLA leave — claiming performance-related reasons — the plaintiff sued. Ultimately, the appeals court sided with the employer, but the decision shows why it’s important for employers to tread carefully in such cases. Mercer v. Arc of Prince Georges County, No. 13-1300, July 11, 2013 (4th Cir.) Yashenko v. Harrah’s NC Casino Co., No. 05-1256, April 27, 2006 (4th Cir.) McDonnell Douglas Corp. v. Green, No. 72-490, May 14, 1973 (Supreme Court)

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  • Two-track mind – Lawyers and firms alike benefit from multiple partnership models

    Summer 2013
    Newsletter: Law Firm Management

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Firms that hire and retain only partnership-track associates may be turning away profitable legal talent. Many skilled lawyers don’t want the long hours and heavy responsibilities of equity partnership — and, for those who do, the organizational structure that once supported this goal has become less viable in the 21st century. This article explains why a two-tier system — of equity and nonequity partners — may be the solution.

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  • Upgrading your website – Enhancing your online presence is a must

    June / July 2013
    Newsletter: Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Despite the critical role websites play in most businesses’ marketing initiatives, many suffer from ineffective designs that visitors find difficult to read or navigate. This article shows how a company can ensure its site is doing all it can to reflect positively on the business. It involves having fresh, visually appealing content that’s easy to access and that allows the company to use site visit data to more precisely target marketing efforts and potentially boost traffic and revenue.

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  • Shopping for tax savings – Relocating a trust to a tax-friendly state

    September / October 2011
    Newsletter: Estate Planner

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: If a trust is subject to high state income taxes, it may be possible to change its residence — or “situs” — to a state with low or no income taxes. But not all trusts are the same — nor are state laws. This article explains which types of trusts may be good candidates for relocation, along with the factors that states use in determining a trust’s state of “residence” for tax purposes. It also discusses the steps involved in moving a trust.

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  • Multistate taxation efforts ramp up – Be aware of states with which your company may have nexus

    June / July 2011
    Newsletter: Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 625

    Abstract: Before a business transaction triggers income or sales tax in a particular state, the company involved typically has to have a nexus — that is, a connection or link — with the state. Until recently, nexus generally was presumed to exist only if the business had a physical presence in the state. In this Internet age, however, even businesses without such a presence may be obligated to pay income or sales taxes. And states have different criteria for determining just what triggers their income or sales taxes. This article looks at some of the criteria used to establish nexus and describes attempts that have been made to streamline regulations among the states.

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