MAF

Showing 209–224 of 244 results

  • Ask the Advisor – Q. Should my distressed company consider a debt restructuring?

    June / July 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 579

    Abstract: Financially troubled companies facing severe cashflow problems may need to seek alternative methods to satisfy their outstanding debts. This column discusses one option: an out-of-court debt restructuring. In a debt restructuring, a company informally renegotiates outstanding debt obligations with its creditors. The resulting agreement is legally binding, and can enable the distressed company to reduce its debt, extend maturities, alter payment terms or consolidate loans. Debt restructuring is a far less extreme and burdensome — not to mention, expensive — alternative to filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

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  • In shape to sell – How fit is your business?

    June / July 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 692

    Abstract: Even when owners aren’t planning to sell their business for years, they should use the intervening time to make it more attractive to eventual buyers. To improve a company’s value and fitness for sale, businesses likely need to firm up their balance sheet as well as subject operations and even employees to performance and productivity measures. This process involves auditing financial statements to find weak spots, and making infrastructure improvements to reduce inefficiencies. And, since buyers may be more risk-averse in the future, a risk assessment is important, as well.

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  • Selling a distressed company at a healthy price

    June / July 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 670

    Abstract: Selling may be the best option for financially distressed companies. But distressed companies face obstacles healthier companies don’t — namely, finding a buyer that will accept the financial challenges and pay the seller a fair price for the opportunity to turn the business around. Sellers don’t necessarily have to settle for a fire-sale price but they do need to understand what they have and how they can market it most effectively.

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  • Solve your credit crisis with seller financing

    June / July 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 876

    Abstract: With much of the credit markets in a deep freeze, M&A activity has, not surprisingly, declined. Many buyers simply can’t find the financing they need to make acquisitions. A prospective seller, however, can attract buyers or help keep a planned deal alive by agreeing to finance at least part of the acquisition by deferring a portion of the selling price. Seller financing can be accomplished through an installment plan or a seller loan. This article describes how either approach can benefit both parties.

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  • Ask the Advisor – Q. Should I sign a TSA when I sell my business?

    April / May 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 432

    Abstract: This column defines transition services agreements (TSAs) as legal contracts in which a business buyer agrees to pay the seller a fee to maintain specific services for the business after the deal closes. It also explains why TSAs appeal to both parties. They free buyers from immediate responsibility for all of an acquisition’s operations and help speed up the deal process — meaning sellers get paid faster.

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  • Look out! – Spotting the signs of a troubled deal

    April / May 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 845

    Abstract: M&A transactions are long — and delicate — processes, and there’s plenty that can go wrong before they close. This article helps both buyers and sellers spot signs of trouble, such as cultural incompatibilities, employee battles over customer accounts and management positions, and unchecked rumors circulating among stakeholders, including vendors and investors.

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  • Never too early – Start preparing your business for sale now

    April / May 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 805

    Abstract: Most business owners are too consumed with the day-to-day responsibilities of running a company to have time to prepare it for eventual sale. This article advises owners to plan ahead and start thinking about what a potential buyer may seek in an acquisition, such as name recognition or solid balance sheets. Businesses should perform a self-analysis, streamline operations as much as possible and scrutinize themselves through the eyes of competitors and strategic partners.

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  • When to sell a division or subsidiary

    April / May 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 767

    Abstract: One of the best ways a company can weather a weak economy is to streamline operations through the divestiture of divisions or subsidiaries. This article discusses the potential benefits of selling a unit, explains why it’s easier to sell a subsidiary than a division and suggests ways to find a buyer by targeting companies operating in the same product niche or a complementary sector.

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  • Ask the Advisor – Q. How can a business valuation help me plan my exit strategy?

    February / March 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 519

    Abstract: The column argues that when an owner decides to move on — whether motivated by a planned event such as retirement or by unforeseen circumstances such as a health crisis — an accurate business valuation is essential. Services valuators provide, such as normalizing financial statements and suggesting small changes that can improve a company’s perceived value, are discussed briefly.

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  • M&A insurance can shield your deal from risk

    February / March 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 807

    Abstract: M&A insurance can protect both buyers and sellers from possible deal breakers, including hidden liabilities, negative tax treatment, valuation issues, legal obstacles and environmental hazards. This article discusses types of M&A insurance, such as representations and warranties, environmental, and tax liability, and helps readers understand when they might need specialized coverage.

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  • Snake in the grass – Employee-related liabilities can poison your deal

    February / March 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 719

    Abstract: A business buyer that fails to consider its target’s employee benefits could be putting its acquisition at risk. Benefits, retirement plans, health insurance and paid time off can eat away at the bottom line. Buyers are encouraged to determine which party will assume responsibility for such benefits as pension plans and COBRA coverage well before the transaction closes.

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  • Strategic alliances – When two is better than one

    February / March 2009
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 733

    Abstract: This article explains how a strategic alliance may be an option for growing companies when a sale or acquisition isn’t feasible. Carefully chosen and executed alliances can yield many of the benefits of a successful merger — including increased revenue and market share and the acquisition of key employees — but without the time, cost or hassle. The advantages and potential drawbacks of joint ventures and contractual alliances are discussed.

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  • Ask the Advisor – Q. Does my private company need to comply with any SOX provisions?

    Year End 2008
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 477

    Abstract: This column explains how private companies can benefit from adopting Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) provisions — particularly if they expect their business to be acquired by a public company. SOX adherence makes sellers more attractive to public company buyers, which can result in a higher sale price. Compliance with SOX can also improve a company’s image and reputation with investors, lenders and the public by demonstrating it has nothing to hide.

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  • A sprint and a marathon – How dual-purpose integration supports short- and long-term goals

    Year End 2008
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 729

    Abstract: Sometimes M&A dealmakers focus too much on the first few months of postclosing integration and neglect to plan for the long-term success of a deal. But as this article argues, dual-purpose integration plans that are closely coordinated, yet have distinct purposes, help to immediately secure deal benefits as well as set the merged organization on the path to future success.

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  • Cross-border M&As – Don’t let people power become people problems

    Year End 2008
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 843

    Abstract: Managing the legal, financial and operational details of any acquisition can be arduous, and that’s doubly true of foreign transactions. But among the greatest challenges cross-border buyers face are the “people” issues — including cultural differences and local labor laws and regulations. This article discusses strategies for coping with human resource issues that could trip up a deal.

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  • Get smart about intellectual property

    Year End 2008
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 917

    Abstract: Intellectual property (IP) is a central, even defining, asset for many companies, and some M&A deals hinge on gaining access to IP assets such as patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets. This article tells sellers how to prepare IP for buyer scrutiny — including being ready to demonstrate legal rights to this intangible property. And it instructs buyers to perform careful due diligence so that they can be sure they’ll get what they’re paying for.

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