Nonprofit Observer

Showing 161–176 of 202 results

  • Cybercrime – Are your donors safe?

    Spring 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 422

    Abstract: Hackers and identity thieves increasingly target charities because they typically have smaller budgets for computer security and are less tech-savvy. Just because a nonprofit hasn’t experienced problems doesn’t mean it’s safe. Even without the budget to launch a full-scale offensive, nonprofits can take steps to protect their constituents, so that supporters don’t have to worry about disclosing personal information to them.

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  • The great nonprofit challenge – Finding new board members

    Spring 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 561

    Abstract: Although an underperforming board should always be a concern for nonprofits, weak leadership is particularly serious when budgets are tight and major strategic decisions need to be made. What’s more, government regulators are increasing their oversight of nonprofits and their boards, making finding and keeping dedicated directors essential to any organization’s future. This article offers advice on how to find board members who are enthusiastic about the nonprofit’s mission and are able to meet its changing needs and circumstances.

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  • What you can do about state funding cuts

    Spring 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 621

    Abstract: In 2011, most states are struggling to balance their budgets. And while everyone is feeling the pinch, nonprofits may be disproportionately affected because they don’t typically have the lobbying muscle of other special interests. This article offers tips that nonprofits can use to increase their political influence, including banding together with other organizations and honing the message they send to politicians and the public.

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  • Making the most of your nonprofit’s program budget

    Spring 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 866

    Abstract: No nonprofit wants to cut programs that it believes further its mission and meet its constituents’ needs. But financial hard times have forced many charities to scale back or even eliminate programs. This article explains how nonprofits can benefit from the occasional program review to ensure they’re getting the biggest bang for their buck. It discusses the basics of doing research, measuring progress, and improving existing programs or starting new ones. A sidebar talks about strategic partnerships with other nonprofits.

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  • New credit makes health care coverage more affordable

    Winter 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 307

    Abstract: One of the provisions of 2010’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is a health care tax credit for small employers, including nonprofits. The credit could significantly reduce health care costs — or enable nonprofits to offer employees coverage even where it might have seemed unaffordable. This article helps nonprofits determine whether they’re eligible.

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  • Unraveling the mystery of donor motivation

    Winter 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 716

    Abstract: People support charities not only for tax breaks and a vague sense of “giving back,” but also for a variety of other financial, emotional and social reasons. Understanding what motivates donors and how their motivations vary across demographic groups can help nonprofits more effectively reach and engage potential supporters. This article reviews research on the subject and suggests ways for organizations to use it.

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  • D&O insurance allows your board to do good, safely

    Winter 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 564

    Abstract: In the corporate world, directors and officers (D&O) liability insurance is considered a must-have. Unfortunately, many nonprofits fail to obtain this type of coverage because they think they’re less likely to have litigation concerns. But hundreds of nonprofits are sued every year. This article helps nonprofits determine if they need D&O insurance, and if so, what coverage they should or shouldn’t obtain.

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  • Too much work, too few hands – Outsourcing can help solve understaffing problems

    Winter 2011
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 913

    Abstract: Thousands of U.S. charities have been forced to cut staff for lack of funds to pay them. This article examines what nonprofits should do if they’re short on staff and don’t have the funds or confidence in the future to hire employees — or even to retain the ones they have. Specifically, it lists the advantages of outsourcing some positions, but the drawbacks of doing so for others. A sidebar discusses how to make the most of volunteers.

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  • New L3C structure – Building a bridge between nonprofits and for-profits

    Fall 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 694

    Abstract: Traditionally, nonprofit and for-profit organizations have operated in very different financial and regulatory spheres. The new low-profit limited liability company (L3C) option could change that. Although this business structure has become law in only a handful of states, it’s available to any organization that wants to pursue a charitable mission and realize a profit. This article explains how L3Cs operate and why they appear to offer promise for social entrepreneurs and nonprofits with clear revenue streams.

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  • Investment fraud – Your nonprofit may be an unwitting victim

    Fall 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 578

    Abstract: Victims of investment fraud aren’t only individuals and for-profit companies. Nonprofits — which often operate on trust, rely on the services of volunteers, and receive income from varied sources — are especially vulnerable. This article provides several recent examples of investment fraud and discusses how nonprofits can protect themselves from fraudulent investment advisors and dishonest donors.

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  • Make the budgeting process easier and more effective

    Fall 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 576

    Abstract: Several principles can help make the budgeting task less onerous for nonprofits. This article explains the importance of reviewing strategic objectives for the coming year, and ensuring that both the organization’s capital budget and operating budget can support them. And monthly budget reviews can help nonprofits stay abreast of circumstances that may make it difficult to stick to their original budget.

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  • Rain or shine — operating reserves protect you from the elements

    Fall 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 785

    Abstract: Maintaining adequate operating reserves is essential to the health of every nonprofit. This article talks about the amount nonprofits should keep in reserve, when tapping reserves is acceptable, and the importance of being able to do so quickly. A sidebar discusses the downside of having too much in reserves.

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  • SROI: Investing in impact

    Summer 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 452

    Abstract: Although hard dollars will always affect an organization’s ability to achieve its goals, many nonprofits are shifting their focus from an economic return on investment (ROI) to a social ROI (SROI) model. SROI can be a better measure of a nonprofit’s impact than traditional financial metrics because it focuses on how inputs, resources and policies help improve the lives of the individuals or communities the organization serves. SROI provides nonprofits with a way to measure and communicate the good they do.

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  • Don’t let a crisis KO your big event

    Summer 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 481

    Abstract: Almost no benefit, gala, meeting or conference goes off without at least a small hitch. And event planners who aren’t prepared could see their big event turn into a disaster. A sound crisis management plan should address risk exposure, attendees’ travel planes, accommodations for those with special needs, and reliable communications with employees and vendors. It may also be appropriate to assemble a crisis response team.

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  • Fraud prevention – The buck stops at your board

    Summer 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 587

    Abstract: Approximately 14% of all frauds in the United States occur at nonprofit organizations, for a median loss of $109,000. In some circumstances, boards are partly responsible. Many board members are volunteers who have little involvement with the organization’s day-to-day activities and don’t necessarily understand their role in preventing fraud. It’s essential that they learn to work closely with auditors and take responsibility for reviewing not only financial statements, but also the highest levels of executive management.

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  • Have you strayed from your mission? Time to get back on track

    Summer 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Observer

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 938

    Abstract: Economic conditions over the past few years have forced nonprofit leaders to make many difficult decisions that affect their organizations’ programs. Inadequate funding may have diverted attention from goals and led to program downsizing, or even dramatic changes in direction. Such organizations may need to update their mission, or determine whether they’ve strayed too far from it. If they have, they may neglect what donors and other key constituents want, and could even lose their tax-exempt status. In the worst case, they could go out of business altogether, as a sidebar to this article illustrates.

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