Construction Industry Advisor

Showing 177–192 of 210 results

  • Don’t throw in the towel – How to get your groove back after the recession

    Spring 2010
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 508

    Abstract: After several years of this tough economy, many contractors may be ready to throw in the towel. But they can get back in the groove by harnessing cash flow and actively managing their company’s finances. Every contractor should have three- to six-month cash flow projections, and not let client debts mount. This is also a good time to look at capitalization, accounting practices and other financial management issues. Nor should marketing efforts be overlooked.

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  • IRS employment exams: Will your construction company pass the test?

    Spring 2010
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 735

    Abstract: Recently, the IRS launched an audit program that focuses on employment tax issues. As part of a National Research Project (NRP), the IRS will randomly select approximately 6,000 employers over the next three years for detailed employment tax examinations. The IRS offers few details about the specific issues it plans to probe, but it’s expected that some of the main employment tax issues NRP audits will target include worker classification, officer compensation and reimbursed expenses. A sidebar to this article discusses the Davis-Bacon Act, a federal law that requires contractors to pay a “prevailing wage” on most federal projects.

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  • Contractor’s Toolbox – Is your immigration program up to date?

    Winter 2010
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 431

    Abstract: In recent years, the U.S. government has shifted its focus from employees working in the United States illegally to the employers who hire them. To protect one’s company and its management against civil fines and possible criminal charges, it’s important to have an immigration compliance program that’s up to date. This article provides answers to four important questions employers should be asking themselves.

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  • Long before you’re ready to retire … Take time to build a solid succession plan

    Winter 2010
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 605

    Abstract: The earlier succession planning begins, the better. Developing and grooming a successor will take time, as will preparing employees and managers to adjust to a new ownership structure. It’s also necessary to bring together a team of experts to help create a workable succession plan that provides for a sound management structure and includes a buy-sell agreement. Or it may be better to sell the company to an outside party, or to employees through an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP). All options require planning well in advance of an owner’s retirement.

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  • 6 tips for boosting profitability

    Winter 2010
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 655

    Abstract: The construction business is risky not only from a safety perspective, but from a financial perspective as well — thin profit margins, unpredictable site conditions, volatile costs, change orders and the use of multiple subcontractors. There are six ways a contractor can improve profitability, including evaluating one’s estimating procedures, knowing indirect costs, and building sufficient profit into the bid.

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  • Accounting for long-term contracts – Understanding look-back is in your best interest

    Winter 2010
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 869

    Abstract: When the percentage-of-completion method (PCM) is used to account for long-term contracts, income might end up being understated or overstated. Either way, it’s important for tax reporting purposes to understand the look-back rules, in which one “looks back” at the income or loss reported for the job for each tax year during which the contract was performed. This article takes a look at the procedures involved, and instances in which the look-back rules don’t apply. A sidebar discusses the simplified marginal impact method (SMIM) that non-closely-held pass-through entities are required to use.

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  • Contractor’s Toolbox – Is subcontractor safety any of your business?

    Fall 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 417

    Abstract: When a general contractor was cited for its subcontractor’s safety violations — even though the safety of only the subcontractor’s employees was at stake — the contractor appealed. But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit upheld the citation. Although this case is binding in only the midwestern states included in the Eighth Circuit, it’s likely that OSHA will continue to enforce its controlling employer citation policy in other locales. Contractors will be wise to modify construction contracts to require subcontractors to comply with OSHA safety requirements as well as the contractor’s safety plan.

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  • Public construction projects – Reinventing yourself to compete

    Fall 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 736

    Abstract: The struggling economy has been tough on the construction industry, particularly for contractors that do residential and commercial work. Many contractors have reinvented themselves to take advantage of new opportunities in public works construction. But it’s critical to get up to speed on the rules for bidding on public contracts. One misstep can be the difference between winning and losing a job, or worse yet, the difference between profit and loss. It’s important to learn where to find out about these often little-publicized jobs, and then get acquainted with the strict bidding rules that accompany them. A sidebar looks at some of these specific technicalities.

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  • Eliminate the creep! How to manage indirect costs

    Fall 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 608

    Abstract: What a construction company spends on project management, repairs, small tools, office trailers and so forth can easily creep up on it. These indirect job costs — if not properly allocated to their projects — can cause overhead to increase and profitability to suffer. It’s important to break down and analyze spending, and determine how indirect costs affect projects. A contractor should also review the amounts it’s paying vendors. Set up correctly, an indirect-cost allocation system can help a contractor to bid projects more realistically and build up its bottom line.

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  • Subcontractors and surety bonds: 5 tips for getting paid

    Fall 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 675

    Abstract: It’s a big mistake for a subcontractor to assume that it’s protected by payment or performance bonds. Before a contract is signed, it’s necessary to perform the due diligence needed to confirm that required bonds exist, that they’re valid and sufficient, and that the surety is financially stable. This article lists five steps a subcontractor should take to help ensure it gets paid for its work and materials.

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  • FAR-reaching rules for government contractors

    Summer 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 336

    Abstract: Contractors performing work for the federal government must become familiar with the recently revised Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). They are now required to disclose certain overpayments and legal violations. And those who are involved with larger projects must implement rigorous business ethics programs and internal control systems. This short article looks at some of the details.

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  • Contractor’s Toolbox – Don’t wait! Time’s running out on certain tax breaks

    Summer 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 591

    Abstract: In the wake of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), contractors stand to benefit from not only spending initiatives for infrastructure and other construction projects, but also several tax incentives. These include a temporary extension of the 50% bonus depreciation and the enhanced Section 179 expensing election. Contractors planning any asset expenditures should take an immediate look at these incentives, but also keep in mind the bonding and banking effect of any major asset acquisition, so that liquidity and leverage ratios don’t suffer.

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  • What’s so captivating about captive insurance?

    Summer 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 720

    Abstract: Captive insurance is a type of self-insurance that can help all types of businesses reduce costs. But is it right for every construction company? Maybe, maybe not. It can depend on the size of a company, the kinds of insurance covered, the location of a captive and the tax consequences of that location. But, if the conditions are right, there are specific benefits that a captive can offer a construction firm.

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  • Know your financial pulse: It could save your company’s life

    Summer 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 934

    Abstract: Just as a wise patient undergoes regular medical checkups, a construction company should have regular financial checkups. Doing so will help it stay in compliance with loan covenants and maintain its bonding capacity. There are numerous ratios and other metrics that can be used, but it’s important for a contractor to select a manageable number of indicators that makes sense for the company and measure its performance in various areas. Four especially important kinds of ratios involve profitability, liquidity, leverage and efficiency; this article gives examples of each kind. A sidebar discusses the importance of negotiating loan covenants with lenders in this constricted lending environment.

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  • Contractor’s Toolbox – Lawsuits may be on the rise – The right precautions can help you avoid them

    Spring 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 453

    Abstract: Lawsuits are a common means of righting wrongs, fixing mistakes and recouping expenses. But now, as a tough economy forces many to look for cash wherever they can find it, litigation may be seen as a quick source of income. This article explores how you may be able to avoid lawsuits by taking the right precautions.

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  • Grow your business in a slow economy? Yes!

    Spring 2009
    Newsletter: Construction Industry Advisor

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 364

    Abstract: The current slowdown actually provides opportunity for growth, especially with the spending provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This brief article explains how ARRA will fund $30 billion for highway and bridge construction projects and $7.7 billion for federal buildings.

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