April / May

Showing 353–368 of 450 results

  • Get ready to file – Form 5500 and Schedule SSA updates

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Employee Benefits Update

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 477

    Abstract: Another IRS filing season is looming, and two major changes await those readying to prepare Form 5500 for the 2010 calendar year: 1) EFAST2 and its impact on Form 5500 filing, and 2) the making of Schedule SSA a separate filing from Form 5500. This article looks at each of them.

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  • How much does that cost? New fee disclosure rules

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Employee Benefits Update

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 768

    Abstract: Last fall, the Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) released its long-anticipated and groundbreaking final rule on 401(k) plan fee disclosures. The rule holds more retirement plan sponsors and employers accountable for their fiduciary duties and affects almost half a million retirement plans in the United States. This article reviews the final rule.

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  • What employers should know about traditional and Roth IRAs

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Employee Benefits Update

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 927

    Abstract: Many plan sponsors use a deferred compensation plan such as a 401(k) plan to offer their employees a retirement benefit. But another option to consider is teaching employees about individual retirement accounts (IRAs). With an IRA, employees take personal payroll deductions to channel funds into their accounts. While employers neither sponsor nor manage IRAs, this article examines what employers need to know and why they matter to employers.

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  • Back to Basics – Do you read the statement of cash flows?

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Commercial Lending Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 485

    Abstract: The statement of cash flows is sandwiched between income statement and footnote disclosures in borrowers’ annual financial reports. Much like a middle child, it rarely garners the attention it deserves. But savvy lenders know that it contains valuable information about the sources and uses of their borrowers’ cash. This article discusses the four sections of the statement and how to glean important information from them.

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  • Keep tabs on distressed borrowers

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Commercial Lending Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 1020

    Abstract: Some borrowers continue to limp along — wounded and headed for failure — despite reports of a gradual economic recovery. Lenders who let their guard down are likely to get burned. This article offers the hypothetical case of Jane, a lender who was almost undone by blind trust in a long-time borrower. When the borrower became ill and his son took over, she didn’t immediately realize that he was in over his head. Fortunately, she took corrective actions in the nick of time. In a sidebar, Jane is more diligent in recognizing another borrower’s fraudulent activity.

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  • “I quit” – 4 questions to ask when a CFO leaves

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Commercial Lending Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 532

    Abstract: The CFO is the CEO’s right hand in most businesses, and his or her departure should be examined closely to determine whether it will affect the borrower’s creditworthiness. This article offers four important questions to consider: How important is the CFO to the company’s performance? Why is the person leaving? What will the stockholders think? And does the company have a replacement strategy?

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  • Your customers’ costs – Understanding health care reform

    April / May 2011
    Newsletter: Commercial Lending Report

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 718

    Abstract: As borrowers struggle to earn a profit in today’s topsy-turvy economy, they’re concerned about facing additional financial obligations under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Lenders can help demystify health care reform for their borrowers — and inform them about ways to manage labor costs in the years ahead. This article looks at how much coverage is mandated, and how small businesses can offset their costs through tax credits and a Small Business Health Options Program or “SHOP exchange.” It also looks at several nuances of the health care tax credit.

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  • How to respond to an SEC comment letter

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Public Company Insights

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 458

    Abstract: When it comes to anxiety-producing correspondence, a letter from the SEC ranks right up there with one from the IRS. Although legal advisors and auditors should be notified right away, there’s no reason to panic when receiving an SEC letter. In many cases the reviewer is simply seeking an explanation. The company needs to contact the SEC so it understands what it’s looking for. In many cases, the SEC’s concerns can be addressed informally, without the need for an immediate restatement.

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  • Proxy disclosure rules are finalized

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Public Company Insights

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 381

    Abstract: In December 2009, the SEC issued final proxy disclosure amendments. These include significant changes from the proposed rules that the SEC issued in July 2009 related to compensation policies, leadership structure and risk, and reporting of voting results.

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  • Management buyouts demand board vigilance

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Public Company Insights

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 655

    Abstract: Courts often are deferential to directors in cases involving mergers and company sales. But, as a decision by the Delaware Chancery Court shows, that deference has a limit. The plaintiffs claimed that the company’s CEO and directors had breached their fiduciary duties and that the board had committed waste. In refuting the defense, the court pointed to three key facts that “make it impossible to dismiss the complaint.” This case underscores the need for boards to take an active role in negotiations — particularly when a controlling shareholder is involved.

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  • Tax Court ruling – Can you deduct a subsidiary’s expenses?

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Public Company Insights

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 974

    Abstract: In a 2009 decision, the U.S. Tax Court held that a company couldn’t deduct expenses it had paid on a subsidiary’s behalf, because they weren’t ordinary and necessary to its own trade or business. This opinion provides a guide for distinguishing between deductible expenses and capital contributions. The court suggested that the outcome might have been different if the taxpayer had operated other businesses whose reputations or credit ratings would have suffered as a result of its failure to cover its subsidiary’s obligations. Indeed, a sidebar to this article illustrates such a case, in which a deduction was allowed.

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  • News for Nonprofits – HOW CAN YOU FIND NEW STAFF?

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 474

    Abstract: This issue’s “News for Nonprofits” looks at Web sites that are useful for recruiting personnel; a survey addressing donor contribution trends; and new, lower IRS mileage rates for employees who use their vehicles for work.

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  • Goodbye SAS 112, hello SAS 115 – Don’t over-rely on your auditors for financial statement prep

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 987

    Abstract: Applying AICPA Statement on Auditing Standards No. 115, Communicating Internal Control Related Matters Identified in an Audit (SAS 115), will be required during the next fiscal year audit (for periods ending on or after Dec. 15, 2009). This new standard supersedes SAS 112 of the same title. As with SAS 112, understanding what constitutes “control deficiencies,” “significant deficiencies” and “material weaknesses” is key to applying the standard. This article shows how to spot control deficiencies, determine their severity, and book adjustments for them. A sidebar explains what constitutes a material adjustment.

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  • Get in shape – How to form — or improve — an audit committee

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 648

    Abstract: Some states require not-for-profits with a certain level of annual revenue to have an audit committee in place. Others strongly encourage it. But, even without regulatory prodding, forming an audit committee allows nonprofits an opportunity to get financial experts involved who have knowledge of the audit process. But it’s important to adopt best practices, and make sure that participants are independent and have the right financial backgrounds.

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  • Outsourcing bookkeeping

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Nonprofit Agendas

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 497

    Abstract: The economic downturn has many nonprofits strapped for cash and outsourcing routine functions to cut costs. Bookkeeping is one of them. And while outsourcing this task has many benefits — such as saving time, labor and resources — it also has a few drawbacks. But setting clear expectations and strong lines of communication from the start can usually ward off potential problems.

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  • Ask the Advisor – Q. How should I handle compensation-related disparities in my merger?

    April / May 2010
    Newsletter: Merger & Acquisition Focus

    Price: $225.00, Subscriber Price: $157.50

    Word count: 457

    Abstract: As this column explains, compensation may seem like a minor detail when buying or selling a company, but it can cause major headaches — particularly when the two companies’ compensation practices differ. The worst decision a buyer can make is to leave current compensation structures alone. But compensation decisions can be tricky because they usually require some tradeoff between cost savings and the pursuit of growth objectives.

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